Posts tagged "photojournalism"
  1. Notes: 4 / 9 months ago  from dan-hill
    dan-hill:

Black Ops

Amazing images of war in the dead of night.

    dan-hill:

    Black Ops

    Amazing images of war in the dead of night.

     
  2. Notes: 615 / 2 years ago  from (originally from climateadaptation)
    Tin Foil, Tea, & the GOP: pixyled: Breaking: Republicans hear woman’s testimony on coal...

    pixyled:

    Breaking: Republicans hear woman’s testimony on coal pollution. Afterwards, attempt to have her arrested for child pornography.

    queernonymoose:

    Maria was going to show another picture to the House subcommittee yesterday, this photo, which is a photo of a five year old child bathing in that kind of brown, poisonous water. The child is naked, as you normally are when you bathe. I’d invite you to click that link, and think about what, if anything, distresses you about it… Maria was told that she would not be allowed to show that photo. It was not appropriate. She had the blessing of the child’s parents, but Republicans on the subcommittee alerted the capitol police (according to Spencer Pederson, a spokesman for GOP panel members), and after the hearing, the capitol police took Maria aside for questioning about “child pornography.”

    Hilarious. Especially considering the ruling on child pornography is all “I know it when I see it”.

    Because yes, showing evidence of environmental atrocities is totes child pornography.

    Unfucking believable.

    This shit is what makes me not want to do this any more.

    (Source: climateadaptation)

  3. Notes: 59 / 2 years ago  from liquidnight
    liquidnight:

Robert Capa
Haifa, Israel, 1949
From Robert Capa: The Definitive Collection

    liquidnight:

    Robert Capa

    Haifa, Israel, 1949

    From Robert Capa: The Definitive Collection

     
  4. Notes: 956 / 2 years ago  from capnswing (originally from inothernews)
    inothernews:

From the New York Daily News:

At the corner of Maiden and Water Streets I spoke to a National Lawyer’s  Guild observer who said she watched a video of a police motorcycle run  over another Lawyer’s Guild observer’s leg and then saw with her own  eyes that man get pushed to the ground by police, be arrested and get  thrown into a police van. “He’s a legal observer with the  National Lawyer’s Guild, he was observing the protest and he was run  over by a police motorcycle,” said Zainab Akbar, 31.Akbar said  she watched the entire thing on the video camera of a protester and then  watched with her own eyes the end of the incident, with the observer,  whom she could only identify as ‘Ari,’ being arrested and put into the  back of a police van.“His leg was stuck under the bike and he  kicked his leg to get the bike off his leg and then the police attacked  him and shoved him into the ground and put a night stick against the  back of his neck,” Akbar said.

This photo was taken by Joe Marino for the Daily News.  He’s one of the photographers seen in this photo allegedly just standing there, taking pictures, instead of helping.  
Now y’all know why.
Furthermore, 1010 WINS reporter Steve Sandberg (sorry, no link) has natsound of the incident, with the man, pinned under the motorcycle, screaming, in excruciating pain.

It’s sad that there are actually people who need to have it explained to them that photographers doing their job isn’t the problem, it’s the police running a guy over and violently arresting him that’s the problem.

    inothernews:

    From the New York Daily News:

    At the corner of Maiden and Water Streets I spoke to a National Lawyer’s Guild observer who said she watched a video of a police motorcycle run over another Lawyer’s Guild observer’s leg and then saw with her own eyes that man get pushed to the ground by police, be arrested and get thrown into a police van.

    “He’s a legal observer with the National Lawyer’s Guild, he was observing the protest and he was run over by a police motorcycle,” said Zainab Akbar, 31.

    Akbar said she watched the entire thing on the video camera of a protester and then watched with her own eyes the end of the incident, with the observer, whom she could only identify as ‘Ari,’ being arrested and put into the back of a police van.

    “His leg was stuck under the bike and he kicked his leg to get the bike off his leg and then the police attacked him and shoved him into the ground and put a night stick against the back of his neck,” Akbar said.

    This photo was taken by Joe Marino for the Daily News.  He’s one of the photographers seen in this photo allegedly just standing there, taking pictures, instead of helping. 

    Now y’all know why.

    Furthermore, 1010 WINS reporter Steve Sandberg (sorry, no link) has natsound of the incident, with the man, pinned under the motorcycle, screaming, in excruciating pain.

    It’s sad that there are actually people who need to have it explained to them that photographers doing their job isn’t the problem, it’s the police running a guy over and violently arresting him that’s the problem.

     
  5. Notes: 1263 / 3 years ago  from bremser (originally from bremser)
    bremser:

Update: Oscar Grant’s photograph of  Johannes Mehserle
This interview was posted about six months ago; this week Mehserle was released from prison, after serving one year of a two-year sentence.
Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the  recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.
Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.
Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being  detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing  wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras” is essential reading on this subject.
Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.
How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?
Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.
It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.
It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.
What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?
Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.
Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?
I don’t recall.
Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?
Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

    bremser:

    Update: Oscar Grant’s photograph of Johannes Mehserle

    This interview was posted about six months ago; this week Mehserle was released from prison, after serving one year of a two-year sentence.

    Oscar Grant’s photograph of transit police officer Johannes Mehserle is rare: a portrait of the photographer’s killer. Unlike the recent photograph that a politician captured in the Philippines, Grant’s photograph, taken moments before Mehserle shot him in the back, was intentional.

    Much of the media attention given to the Oscar Grant case focused on a handful of videos made by other passengers on the BART train, some of which show Grant being shot. While being detained by BART police, Grant called his ex-girlfriend Sophina Mesa twice from the platform. During this time he also took the photo of Mehserle and sent it to Mesa. Grant’s photograph of Mehserle did not get as much coverage as the videos, as it wasn’t released until the trial began.

    Grant’s photograph raises an important issue that faces every American: the right to photograph, videotape and document while being detained or arrested by the police. Many of us assume we have this right, but with existing wiretapping laws, you can still be arrested and your camera confiscated. Radley Balko’s Reason.com article “The War on Cameras” is essential reading on this subject.

    Demian Bulwa is a reporter and editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, who has covered the Oscar Grant case since the shooting, through the entire Mehserle trial. I asked him a few questions over the phone about this photograph.

    How did the prosecution and defense use this photograph as evidence in the trial?

    Both sides used flat screen TVs, multimedia, everything was timed and choreographed. It seemed they felt they might lose credibility if they weren’t sharp with multimedia. At times the arguments felt like PowerPoint presentations. There were photos, quotes, videos, video of the Taser training.

    It was used by prosecution to show two things: 1. that he [Mehserle] knew his Taser from his gun, that he had actually taken out his Taser twice, that he knew full well between the two weapons. 2. That Oscar was being abused and was concerned about it.

    It was one of many pieces of evidence. It’s part of the puzzle, and hard to tell which ones stuck with the jury.

    What facts were presented about the photograph, when it was taken? Did he take it while face down, turning around?

    Grant was sitting on the ground. The guys were sitting on the edge of the platform for a while. He wouldn’t have had the opportunity in the last moments, the officers were on top of him, with his arms behind him.

    Was there any suggestion by either side that taking this photograph provoked Mehserle, or was some form of resisting arrest?

    I don’t recall.

    Based on the evidence in the trial, and your own speculation, why do you think Oscar Grant took this photograph?

    Most likely he was documenting unfair treatment. He said something to his girlfriend [during the phone call], like “I’m getting beat up here.” It was a way of documenting that, and putting Mehserle on notice. If you take a picture of someone you are saying: I’m watching your behavior. You’re accountable. You are expressing your concern and putting them on notice.

     
  6. Notes: 23 / 3 years ago  from criminalwisdom
    criminalwisdom:

THE SHOT THAT NEARLY KILLED ME Eighteen photojournalists tell The Guardian about that one special photo that nearly did them in …

Ashley Gilbertson:
“I was with a lead unit of marines, and we received a triple ambush from the insurgents. I’d just run across a street with 40 marines to take shelter in an Islamic cultural centre, with bullets whizzing past my face. I thought, if I’m going to die right now, I might as well be working. I was in so much shock. It was a wake-up call to how violent it was going to be.
The guy in the photo is shouting, “Don’t take my fucking picture!” Sometimes, you look at images of war, and they’re like a Hollywood producer’s vision of what war is supposed to look like. There are very few pictures where you get a feel for how fucking awful it is, how desperate and urgent. I like that it’s not a clean picture, that it’s not well composed and you can’t see everything that’s happening. That’s part of it. It’s so messy. It’s the closest I’ve come to capturing the chaos of combat.”

(Source: Nerd Core)

    criminalwisdom:

    THE SHOT THAT NEARLY KILLED ME
    Eighteen photojournalists tell The Guardian about that one special photo that nearly did them in …

    Ashley Gilbertson:

    “I was with a lead unit of marines, and we received a triple ambush from the insurgents. I’d just run across a street with 40 marines to take shelter in an Islamic cultural centre, with bullets whizzing past my face. I thought, if I’m going to die right now, I might as well be working. I was in so much shock. It was a wake-up call to how violent it was going to be.

    The guy in the photo is shouting, “Don’t take my fucking picture!” Sometimes, you look at images of war, and they’re like a Hollywood producer’s vision of what war is supposed to look like. There are very few pictures where you get a feel for how fucking awful it is, how desperate and urgent. I like that it’s not a clean picture, that it’s not well composed and you can’t see everything that’s happening. That’s part of it. It’s so messy. It’s the closest I’ve come to capturing the chaos of combat.”

    (Source: Nerd Core)

     
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