Posts tagged "photography"
  1. Notes: 41 / 2 months ago  from mendelpalace (originally from calamityjon)

    intrapanel:

    calamityjon:

    I’ve been a fan of Matt Maxwell’s Intrapanel Tumblr since its inception, but I found it difficult to articulate what precisely I found so appealing about it until I took camera in hand and tried it for myself. 

    I know that the landscape of comics has changed so dramatically in the last ten years - just in terms of the expansion of the digital landscape - and, arguably, over the last twenty or twenty-five in terms of the production value, expense, volume and accessibility of the books as the direct market overwhelmed the supermarket bookshelves. Comics aren’t so disposable as they once were, they no longer fade and yellow and fall apart - now they’re preserved in light or printed for archive, seemingly forever.

    It’s disreputable to fetishize books as objects, I know - first and foremost the content of the book is the measure of its value. But the relationship between the reader and the book is midwifed by the medium, and the nature of the medium has transitioned, these days, from the vulgar to the imperishable. 

    For me, at eight or nine years old, here’s how comics worked - I walked or biked from my house on Bear Canyon Rd in Tucson Arizona, about a mile south to the to the U-Tote-M,where there was a spinner rack of bent and misarranged books. They’d come home with me in a slim paper bag which the clerk usually reserved for skin mags, clutched in a loose fist, fingers flat, of a hand balanced on one side of the handlebars, desperate not to drop them in the hot dirt or - worse yet - accidentally run over them on the way back. 

    The experience of seeking, buying and shepherding the books was as much a part of the experience as reading them (no wonder we eventually placed them in plastic bags; we worked and worried hard for these things). There’s a fascinating, sensual reaction to these books which exceeds the merely pornographic, there’s gravitas in their shabbiness.

    I think Matt mentioned that the project was “tiny acts of worship”, borrowing another photographer’s sentiment, which is what was brought to mind as I dawdled over the angle of the shots, considering the landscape of the bent pages and cartography of the benday dots and washed out inks. There’s something I’ve heard described as the complete immersion of the self in a moment or a place, which is what I achieved while lurching around this open book with a camera in hand. My whole mind was involved with this book on a level I don’t think it had been since I was a child, utterly engrossed and worshipful of this shabby, impermanent bit of fluff…

    =======================

    Anyway!

    Battlestar Galactica vol.1 No.19
    September 1980
    Walt Simonson - Story and Pencils
    Klaus Janson - Inks
    Tom Rosen - Letters
    Alex Miller - Colors

    This is a thirty-page story that packs the first half of a heist movie into the last eight pages - give this book the attention it deserves and it’s a solid hour’s read for four bits. Simonson is obviously saving the big conflict for the entirety of the next issue, so the dramatic action of this issue is pushed to the back - a strange vessel is careening towards the Galactica, breaking up as it goes, and the crew is convinced it’s the absent Starbuck returning home. Once he brings the ship in (in pieces), a compact four page narrative synchs the disparate story arcs - the panels fill the reader in on Starbuck’s ironic misinformation. There’s a LOT of story happening in a short burst, Simonson gives his money’s worth (and how about those Janson inks?)

    Not sure, in panels three and  five, if those sound effects are courtesy of Simonson or Rosen, maybe a collaboration. I may be mistaken, but I’m under the impression that letterers typically added the sound effects in these old books…

    The virus, it spreads.

    Remember, anyone with a camera can do this. I recommend sticking with direct sunlight and newsprint, though. Glossy pages are a bear. Yes, old covers are glossy, but not nearly as much as new pages/cover stock is now. One of the reasons why there’s a lot of pre-1985 comics here on Intrapanel.

    Also: scanning sucks and is a mechanical, inorganic process. Bleah.

  2. Notes: 100 / 3 months ago  from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

    In Focus: The 2014 Dakar Rally

    On January 5, 431 teams began the annual Dakar Rally: a two-week off-roading adventure through South America. The vehicles — which include specialized cars, trucks, motorcycles, and quadbikes — are traversing extremely challenging territory between Rosario, Argentina, and Valparaíso, Chile. One racer and two members of the press have died so far in separate incidents. As the participants depart the Uyuni Salt Flats today, here is a look at Dakar 2014 in progress.

    Read more.

  3. Notes: 380 / 3 months ago  from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

    In Focus: The Carnival of Vevcani

    Each year, the Macedonian village of Vevcani marks the Orthodox St. Vasilij Day — the beginning of the old Julian calendar — with a 1,400-year-old carnival rooted in pre-Christian traditions. Performers revel in the streets wearing masks that reflect pagan rituals, religious issues, or political satires of current events. Below are some images of the costumes and parades in Vevcani over the past few years.

    Read more.

  4. Notes: 276 / 3 months ago  from the-science-llama

    the-science-llama:

    Portraits in Infrared, Visible and Ultraviolet light
    — Nick Spiker

    The Melanin in the freckles absorbs UV-light very well, making them show up black in the photo. Same thing is going on with sunscreen. You may notice the eyes are darker in UV light at well, another protection mechanism to help prevent UV damage. Melanin doesn’t absorb Infrared wavelengths as much — and IR-light penetrates further into the skin than UV — so the freckles/imperfections will show up less when you select for only those wavelengths in the photo.

  5. Notes: 3 / 4 months ago  from rnfox
    DAD SOLD CRACK HERE - now in ebook form!

    rnfox:

    Remember that time Warren Ellis promoted my first book?

    Promotional!

    Well, not only is it still available to purchase as a (admittedly overpriced) physical object (link!), but now it can be bought in Apple-friendly electronic format!! How exciting! 

  6. Notes: 77 / 4 months ago  from futurejournalismproject
    A Cautionary Tale on the Use of a Photo

    futurejournalismproject:

    Seattle Times:

    Last week, The Seattle Times published a story headlined, “Women-only swim times spark emotional debate,” about a controversy over women-only hours at a pool in Tukwila. The women had requested the female-only swim times for both body-image and religious reasons.

    The story was accompanied by a portrait I took of sisters Faisa Farole and Jamila Farole, who were trying to preserve female-only swim times.

    This week, I learned that the Fox News network aired a story about a Minnesota swimming pool that was setting aside hours for Muslim women to swim. Fox suggested this was an example of the growing influence of Sharia law in the U.S., and included The Seattle Times photo from the Tukwila pool.

    The Fox video clip, which has been shared on blogs across the country and even ran on The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, began this way: “The minority becoming the majority at one community pool. Sharia Law is now changing everything…”

    The Seattle Times did not authorize use of this photograph on Fox News. We are not sure how Fox News acquired this image, though it could be through a labeling mistake by The Associated Press. The Seattle Times often distributes images through the AP but with language that prevents use by television networks.

    Using my photo to illustrate a story on a swimming program in Minnesota, under the title “Sharia Law: Swim Class for Somali Muslim Girls,” is unfair to the young women in the photo and misleads viewers.

  7. Notes: 478 / 4 months ago  from futurejournalismproject
    futurejournalismproject:

Uncensored Instagram Photos from North Korea
via Just Something:

David Guttenfelder is the Associated Press Chief Photographer for Asia, almost a legend in photojournalism. He’s been traveling the world for the most part of his life documenting events like the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, three different Olympic games and many other historical events. He is a seven-time World Press Award winner and has gained various other awards during his brilliant career.
He’s recently been documenting North Korea and since their authorities loosened a bit their restrict policies about photojournalism he’s been one of the first photographers allowed to bring a smartphone inside the country. A 3G network is now available for visitors, so he’s been able to take pictures with his camera phone on the streets of Pyongyang like he could have done in any other part of the world and for the first time he had the chance to upload them on Instagram while still in the country, marking a milestone in the history of photojournalism.
The event is momentous and thanks to David we can now watch for the first time ever some uncensored real life moments directly from North Korea. In the following gallery you will see our favorites among the pictures he took there.

Check them all out here.
Image: Students at a concert (via David Guttenfelder on Instagram).

    futurejournalismproject:

    Uncensored Instagram Photos from North Korea

    via Just Something:

    David Guttenfelder is the Associated Press Chief Photographer for Asia, almost a legend in photojournalism. He’s been traveling the world for the most part of his life documenting events like the genocide in Rwanda, the Israeli Palestinian conflict, three different Olympic games and many other historical events. He is a seven-time World Press Award winner and has gained various other awards during his brilliant career.

    He’s recently been documenting North Korea and since their authorities loosened a bit their restrict policies about photojournalism he’s been one of the first photographers allowed to bring a smartphone inside the country. A 3G network is now available for visitors, so he’s been able to take pictures with his camera phone on the streets of Pyongyang like he could have done in any other part of the world and for the first time he had the chance to upload them on Instagram while still in the country, marking a milestone in the history of photojournalism.

    The event is momentous and thanks to David we can now watch for the first time ever some uncensored real life moments directly from North Korea. In the following gallery you will see our favorites among the pictures he took there.

    Check them all out here.

    Image: Students at a concert (via David Guttenfelder on Instagram).

     
  8. Notes: 86 / 5 months ago  from futurejournalismproject
    futurejournalismproject:

The Psychology of Selfies & A Handmade Pinhole Camera
We learned this week that the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is selfie, the informal noun defined as “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” It was added to the Oxford Dictionary Online (not the Oxford English Dictionary), which bases its entries on current and practical word usage, meaning they can be removed when they are out of use. 
Blog posts about the psychology of the selfie abound. It’s a cheap fad. It’s a an evaluator of social reach. It’s a modern iteration of the self-portrait fueled by a hunger for social feedback. It’s a reflection of our loneliness and desire for image control. And on and on.
And then there is this.
Photographer Tatiano Altberg teaches children in a Rio de Janeiro favela how to make pinhole cameras out of recycled cans. There is no viewfinder and no button. They learn to create narratives through their photos, and to take self-portraits.
Lens Blog:

But unlike the countless “selfies” they were already used to seeing on social networks, these forced them to be more introspective, considering both their mood and environment.
“The challenge of working with pinhole photography is to make the self-portrait a process of reflection about one’s self — a product of an intention,” she said. “The idea is not to take photos in an automatic way, with poses and gestures that are seen in the pictures teenagers take with their cellphones and digital cameras. It’s necessary to pay attention to the surroundings and think before making an image. Pinhole is a slow process of creation that demands a lot of thought.”
The payoff has come with students who have become excited about the possibilities of self-expression. Jailton Nunes was a skeptical 12-year-old when he started the workshop, deflecting any compliment with jokes. But over time, he came to embrace the project, and a self-portrait of his was used on the cover of “Everyday My Thoughts Are Different,” which was published this year.
“Another photo taken by him that is very significant is the one where he appears beside a miniature sofa,” Ms. Altberg said. “He looks like a giant. The image has special symbolic meaning since he was explicitly self-conscious about his height, something that diminished throughout the year as he gained confidence.”


FJP: Here’s a thought. For young teens who live busy lives in crowded spaces (Rio or elsewhere) that are then compounded by an abundance of digital imagery in online social worlds, it’s difficult to find the space to know yourself, to construct an image of yourself for yourself and to capture that image. In a sense, the digital selfie is a way to try to create and preserve a controllable record of who you are in an otherwise uncontrollable world of too many records. It’s a very human need. If we look at it that way, the potential for teaching projects like Altberg’s is enormous.—Jihii
Image: Yasmin Lopez, via Brazilian Stories and Selfies Through a Pinhole, NY Times.

    futurejournalismproject:

    The Psychology of Selfies & A Handmade Pinhole Camera

    We learned this week that the Oxford Dictionaries Word of the Year is selfie, the informal noun defined as “a photograph that one has taken of oneself, typically one taken with a smartphone or webcam and uploaded to a social media website.” It was added to the Oxford Dictionary Online (not the Oxford English Dictionary), which bases its entries on current and practical word usage, meaning they can be removed when they are out of use. 

    Blog posts about the psychology of the selfie abound. It’s a cheap fad. It’s a an evaluator of social reach. It’s a modern iteration of the self-portrait fueled by a hunger for social feedback. It’s a reflection of our loneliness and desire for image control. And on and on.

    And then there is this.

    Photographer Tatiano Altberg teaches children in a Rio de Janeiro favela how to make pinhole cameras out of recycled cans. There is no viewfinder and no button. They learn to create narratives through their photos, and to take self-portraits.

    Lens Blog:

    But unlike the countless “selfies” they were already used to seeing on social networks, these forced them to be more introspective, considering both their mood and environment.

    “The challenge of working with pinhole photography is to make the self-portrait a process of reflection about one’s self — a product of an intention,” she said. “The idea is not to take photos in an automatic way, with poses and gestures that are seen in the pictures teenagers take with their cellphones and digital cameras. It’s necessary to pay attention to the surroundings and think before making an image. Pinhole is a slow process of creation that demands a lot of thought.”

    The payoff has come with students who have become excited about the possibilities of self-expression. Jailton Nunes was a skeptical 12-year-old when he started the workshop, deflecting any compliment with jokes. But over time, he came to embrace the project, and a self-portrait of his was used on the cover of “Everyday My Thoughts Are Different,” which was published this year.

    “Another photo taken by him that is very significant is the one where he appears beside a miniature sofa,” Ms. Altberg said. “He looks like a giant. The image has special symbolic meaning since he was explicitly self-conscious about his height, something that diminished throughout the year as he gained confidence.”

    FJP: Here’s a thought. For young teens who live busy lives in crowded spaces (Rio or elsewhere) that are then compounded by an abundance of digital imagery in online social worlds, it’s difficult to find the space to know yourself, to construct an image of yourself for yourself and to capture that image. In a sense, the digital selfie is a way to try to create and preserve a controllable record of who you are in an otherwise uncontrollable world of too many records. It’s a very human need. If we look at it that way, the potential for teaching projects like Altberg’s is enormous.—Jihii

    Image: Yasmin Lopez, via Brazilian Stories and Selfies Through a Pinhole, NY Times.

     
  9. Notes: 17 / 5 months ago  from danieldieneltstudio

    danieldieneltstudio:

    My town. My folks. My culture. My roads.

  10. Notes: 113 / 5 months ago  from futurejournalismproject
    futurejournalismproject:

William Mumler’s Paranormal Photography
In the 1860s, photographer William Mumler claimed that he could photograph ghosts. He’d take portraits of living people with faint images of the departed lurking behind them, or at times, comforting them, as with the photo he took of Mary Todd being comforted by the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln. Some believed he could actually channel the dead. Others were skeptical and felt he was exploiting the grieving. His insistence that he actually brought back the dead eventually lead to a famous trial in 1869. Read about it in The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer, by Louis Kaplan. It’s a fascinating story.
Minnesota UPress: 

Mumler’s case was an early example of investigative journalism intersecting with a criminal trial that, at its essence, set science against religion. The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer is the definitive resource for this unique and fascinating moment in American history and provides insights into today’s ghosts in the machine. 

Nothing like a deep dive into paranormal photography to celebrate Halloween. Happy All Things Scary, from the FJP.
Image: John J. Glover with a spirit (possibly of his mother), via Wikimedia Commons.

    futurejournalismproject:

    William Mumler’s Paranormal Photography

    In the 1860s, photographer William Mumler claimed that he could photograph ghosts. He’d take portraits of living people with faint images of the departed lurking behind them, or at times, comforting them, as with the photo he took of Mary Todd being comforted by the recently assassinated Abraham Lincoln. Some believed he could actually channel the dead. Others were skeptical and felt he was exploiting the grieving. His insistence that he actually brought back the dead eventually lead to a famous trial in 1869. Read about it in The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer, by Louis Kaplan. It’s a fascinating story.

    Minnesota UPress

    Mumler’s case was an early example of investigative journalism intersecting with a criminal trial that, at its essence, set science against religion. The Strange Case of William Mumler, Spirit Photographer is the definitive resource for this unique and fascinating moment in American history and provides insights into today’s ghosts in the machine. 

    Nothing like a deep dive into paranormal photography to celebrate Halloween. Happy All Things Scary, from the FJP.

    Image: John J. Glover with a spirit (possibly of his mother), via Wikimedia Commons.

     
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Giant Robot Pilot, GhastlyAstronaut
 
 

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