Posts tagged "photography"
  1. Notes: 264 / 4 days ago  from livelymorgue

    livelymorgue:

    March 27, 1921: Contents under pressure — a Weimar-era advertising gimmick put unemployed soldiers to work extolling the virtues of German champagne. Years later, in The Times Magazine, Stephen Spender recalled youthful days in Berlin toward the end of the 1920s. “We saw Berlin as a tremendous phenomenon, but not as the cultural center of the then contemporary Europe,” he wrote. “In fact, I doubt whether Berlin could ever be the center of anything, even of Germany: It is a kind of off-center, just as New York is off-center to the United States.” Photo: The New York Times

  2. Notes: 823 / 1 month ago  from liquidnight
    liquidnight:

Steve McCurry
Iraq
     
  3. Notes: 655 / 2 months ago  from futurejournalismproject
    futurejournalismproject:

Syrians Honor Jim Foley
Image: Residents of Kafranbel, Syria pay tribute to Jim Foley, the American journalist executed by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Via Kafranbel Syrian Revolution on Facebook. Select to embiggen.

    futurejournalismproject:

    Syrians Honor Jim Foley

    Image: Residents of Kafranbel, Syria pay tribute to Jim Foley, the American journalist executed by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria. Via Kafranbel Syrian Revolution on Facebook. Select to embiggen.

     
  4. Notes: 478 / 3 months ago  from liquidnight
    liquidnight:

Henri Cartier-Bresson
Istanbul, 1965
From Henri Cartier-Bresson Photographer

    liquidnight:

    Henri Cartier-Bresson

    Istanbul, 1965

    From Henri Cartier-Bresson Photographer

     
  5. Notes: 271 / 4 months ago  from liquidnight
    liquidnight:

Alexey Titarenko
Untitled, (Zigzag Crowd), 1994
From City of Shadows
[via BLDGBLOG]

    liquidnight:

    Alexey Titarenko

    Untitled, (Zigzag Crowd), 1994

    From City of Shadows

    [via BLDGBLOG]

     
  6. Notes: 352 / 5 months ago  from tea-spooky (originally from vicemag)
    vicemag:

Photo Real – Molly Crabapple on Photoshop, Feminism, and Truth
Two weeks ago, Jezebel published un-retouched outtakes of Lady Gaga’s Versace campaign.
Without Photoshop, Gaga’s wig was more wig-like, her makeup flat beige, but she was the same skinny, strong-nosed chameleon that Stephani Germanotta has always been. The outtakes were not interesting but showing celebrities without Photoshop is Jezebel’s brand.
Jezebel exploded in popularity in 2007 by offering a $10,000 bounty for originals of Faith Hill’s Redbook cover. The raw photos proved the magazine had liquefied the star’s waist, softened her nasiolabial folds, and brutalized her elbow into a bendy tube. This January, with more controversy, Jezebel paid another $10,000 for the originals of Lena Dunham’sVogue cover shoot. Those revealed only a tidied dress.
Jezebel’s is a feminism that seeks its scapegoat in altered images. To refrain from Photoshop is girl-positive marketing gold. Dove Campaign for Real Beauty delights itself by putting out fake filters that chide retouchers. Magazines sign “No Photoshop” pledges. Clothing companies crow that they’ve never taken a clone-stamp to their models’ thighs.
To these feminists, Photoshop is to blame to unrealistic body standards, poor self-esteem, and anorexia in teenage girls. The campaign against Photoshop is the perfect cause for white, middle-class women whose primary problem is feeling their bodies do not match an increasingly surreal media ideal. 
Photoshop, the belief goes, takes a true record of a moment, and turns it into an oppressive lie. 
But fuck Photoshop. Photos are already lies. 
Continue

    vicemag:

    Photo Real – Molly Crabapple on Photoshop, Feminism, and Truth

    Two weeks ago, Jezebel published un-retouched outtakes of Lady Gaga’s Versace campaign.

    Without Photoshop, Gaga’s wig was more wig-like, her makeup flat beige, but she was the same skinny, strong-nosed chameleon that Stephani Germanotta has always been. The outtakes were not interesting but showing celebrities without Photoshop is Jezebel’s brand.

    Jezebel exploded in popularity in 2007 by offering a $10,000 bounty for originals of Faith Hill’s Redbook cover. The raw photos proved the magazine had liquefied the star’s waist, softened her nasiolabial folds, and brutalized her elbow into a bendy tube. This January, with more controversy, Jezebel paid another $10,000 for the originals of Lena Dunham’sVogue cover shoot. Those revealed only a tidied dress.

    Jezebel’s is a feminism that seeks its scapegoat in altered images. To refrain from Photoshop is girl-positive marketing gold. Dove Campaign for Real Beauty delights itself by putting out fake filters that chide retouchers. Magazines sign “No Photoshop” pledges. Clothing companies crow that they’ve never taken a clone-stamp to their models’ thighs.

    To these feminists, Photoshop is to blame to unrealistic body standards, poor self-esteem, and anorexia in teenage girls. The campaign against Photoshop is the perfect cause for white, middle-class women whose primary problem is feeling their bodies do not match an increasingly surreal media ideal. 

    Photoshop, the belief goes, takes a true record of a moment, and turns it into an oppressive lie. 

    But fuck Photoshop. Photos are already lies. 

    Continue

     
  7. Notes: 41 / 8 months ago  from mendelpalace (originally from calamityjon)

    intrapanel:

    calamityjon:

    I’ve been a fan of Matt Maxwell’s Intrapanel Tumblr since its inception, but I found it difficult to articulate what precisely I found so appealing about it until I took camera in hand and tried it for myself. 

    I know that the landscape of comics has changed so dramatically in the last ten years - just in terms of the expansion of the digital landscape - and, arguably, over the last twenty or twenty-five in terms of the production value, expense, volume and accessibility of the books as the direct market overwhelmed the supermarket bookshelves. Comics aren’t so disposable as they once were, they no longer fade and yellow and fall apart - now they’re preserved in light or printed for archive, seemingly forever.

    It’s disreputable to fetishize books as objects, I know - first and foremost the content of the book is the measure of its value. But the relationship between the reader and the book is midwifed by the medium, and the nature of the medium has transitioned, these days, from the vulgar to the imperishable. 

    For me, at eight or nine years old, here’s how comics worked - I walked or biked from my house on Bear Canyon Rd in Tucson Arizona, about a mile south to the to the U-Tote-M,where there was a spinner rack of bent and misarranged books. They’d come home with me in a slim paper bag which the clerk usually reserved for skin mags, clutched in a loose fist, fingers flat, of a hand balanced on one side of the handlebars, desperate not to drop them in the hot dirt or - worse yet - accidentally run over them on the way back. 

    The experience of seeking, buying and shepherding the books was as much a part of the experience as reading them (no wonder we eventually placed them in plastic bags; we worked and worried hard for these things). There’s a fascinating, sensual reaction to these books which exceeds the merely pornographic, there’s gravitas in their shabbiness.

    I think Matt mentioned that the project was “tiny acts of worship”, borrowing another photographer’s sentiment, which is what was brought to mind as I dawdled over the angle of the shots, considering the landscape of the bent pages and cartography of the benday dots and washed out inks. There’s something I’ve heard described as the complete immersion of the self in a moment or a place, which is what I achieved while lurching around this open book with a camera in hand. My whole mind was involved with this book on a level I don’t think it had been since I was a child, utterly engrossed and worshipful of this shabby, impermanent bit of fluff…

    =======================

    Anyway!

    Battlestar Galactica vol.1 No.19
    September 1980
    Walt Simonson - Story and Pencils
    Klaus Janson - Inks
    Tom Rosen - Letters
    Alex Miller - Colors

    This is a thirty-page story that packs the first half of a heist movie into the last eight pages - give this book the attention it deserves and it’s a solid hour’s read for four bits. Simonson is obviously saving the big conflict for the entirety of the next issue, so the dramatic action of this issue is pushed to the back - a strange vessel is careening towards the Galactica, breaking up as it goes, and the crew is convinced it’s the absent Starbuck returning home. Once he brings the ship in (in pieces), a compact four page narrative synchs the disparate story arcs - the panels fill the reader in on Starbuck’s ironic misinformation. There’s a LOT of story happening in a short burst, Simonson gives his money’s worth (and how about those Janson inks?)

    Not sure, in panels three and  five, if those sound effects are courtesy of Simonson or Rosen, maybe a collaboration. I may be mistaken, but I’m under the impression that letterers typically added the sound effects in these old books…

    The virus, it spreads.

    Remember, anyone with a camera can do this. I recommend sticking with direct sunlight and newsprint, though. Glossy pages are a bear. Yes, old covers are glossy, but not nearly as much as new pages/cover stock is now. One of the reasons why there’s a lot of pre-1985 comics here on Intrapanel.

    Also: scanning sucks and is a mechanical, inorganic process. Bleah.

  8. Notes: 112 / 9 months ago  from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

    In Focus: The 2014 Dakar Rally

    On January 5, 431 teams began the annual Dakar Rally: a two-week off-roading adventure through South America. The vehicles — which include specialized cars, trucks, motorcycles, and quadbikes — are traversing extremely challenging territory between Rosario, Argentina, and Valparaíso, Chile. One racer and two members of the press have died so far in separate incidents. As the participants depart the Uyuni Salt Flats today, here is a look at Dakar 2014 in progress.

    Read more.

  9. Notes: 382 / 9 months ago  from theatlantic

    theatlantic:

    In Focus: The Carnival of Vevcani

    Each year, the Macedonian village of Vevcani marks the Orthodox St. Vasilij Day — the beginning of the old Julian calendar — with a 1,400-year-old carnival rooted in pre-Christian traditions. Performers revel in the streets wearing masks that reflect pagan rituals, religious issues, or political satires of current events. Below are some images of the costumes and parades in Vevcani over the past few years.

    Read more.

  10. Notes: 284 / 9 months ago  from the-science-llama

    the-science-llama:

    Portraits in Infrared, Visible and Ultraviolet light
    — Nick Spiker

    The Melanin in the freckles absorbs UV-light very well, making them show up black in the photo. Same thing is going on with sunscreen. You may notice the eyes are darker in UV light at well, another protection mechanism to help prevent UV damage. Melanin doesn’t absorb Infrared wavelengths as much — and IR-light penetrates further into the skin than UV — so the freckles/imperfections will show up less when you select for only those wavelengths in the photo.

avatar_128
 
 
Giant Robot Pilot, GhastlyAstronaut
 
 

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